Advertisement

Uncategorized

  • June 24: The Week in Cancer News

    American Cancer Society reacts to Supreme Court decision, and research highlights the disproportionate burden of cancer mortality on Black people.

    by Marci A. Landsmann

  • June 17: The Week in Cancer News

    Clinical trials rebound after COVID-19 setbacks, and early treatment leads to significant reduction in anal cancer risk among people with HIV.

    by Thomas Celona

  • June 10: The Week in Cancer News

    Patients who lose weight through bariatric surgery have a lower cancer risk, and a HER2-targeted therapy gets striking results in HER2-low breast cancer patients.

    by Kevin McLaughlin

  • June 3: The Week in Cancer News

    Contrast dye shortage delays scans for cancer, and more public assistance linked to higher survival rates for Black cancer patients.

    by Eric Fitzsimmons

  • May 27: The Week in Cancer News

    A blood test could help determine who benefits from checkpoint inhibitors in lung cancer, and the FDA approves a drug combination for certain patients with acute myeloid leukemia.

    by Marci A. Landsmann

  • May 20: The Week in Cancer News

    Esophageal cancer increases in the middle-aged, and adolescent and young adult leukemia survivors face continued mortality risk after treatment ends.

    by Eric Fitzsimmons

  • May 13: The Week in Cancer News

    First child to receive CAR T-cell therapy celebrates 10 years cancer-free, and authorization denials delay treatment for patients with Medicare Advantage.

    by Marci A. Landsmann

  • May 6: The Week in Cancer News

    Adolescents and young adult cancer survivors at higher risk for dying from a new cancer diagnosis, and FDA grants full approval to Enhertu for metastatic HER2-postive breast cancer.

    by Eric Fitzsimmons

  • April 29: The Week in Cancer News

    FDA proposes ban on menthol cigarettes, and proton beam therapy on the rise but with growing racial disparity.

    by Thomas Celona

  • April 22: The Week in Cancer News

    Study finds a connection between bacteria and fast-growing prostate cancer, and researchers measure underrepresentation of Black patients in clinical trials.

    by Kevin McLaughlin

Advertisement