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week in cancer news

  • December 2: The Week in Cancer News

    Oncologists report that prior authorization process interrupts cancer care, and plant-based diet is associated with lower colorectal cancer risk in men but not women.

    by Eric Fitzsimmons

  • November 18: The Week in Cancer News

    Vaccine helps people with brain cancer live longer, and kidney cancer patients see results from off-the-shelf CAR T-cell therapy.

    by Thomas Celona

  • November 11: The Week in Cancer News

    California passes ballot initiative banning flavored tobacco products, and the FDA approves combination treatments for lung cancer.

    by Kevin McLaughlin

  • November 4: The Week in Cancer News

    Female patients less likely than men to be told about sexual side effects of treatment, and independent analysis finds cancer-causing chemical in dry shampoo.

    by Marci A. Landsmann

  • October 28: The Week in Cancer News

    Clinical trial finds select breast cancer patients can forgo surgery, and cancer organizations warn of growing e-cigarette use among teens.

    by Thomas Celona

  • October 21: The Week in Cancer News

    Chemical hair straightening is associated with higher uterine cancer risk, and gas stoves can leak chemicals linked to cancer.

    by Eric Fitzsimmons

  • October 14: The Week in Cancer News

    Colonoscopy study results are misreported, and progress is seen in cancer vaccines.

    by Kevin McLaughlin

  • October 7: The Week in Cancer News

    Transportation barriers increase risk of death for people with cancer, and new rules go into effect to give patients full access to medical records.

    by Marci A. Landsmann

  • September 30: The Week in Cancer News

    Firefighters face increased cancer risk due to exposure to ‘forever chemicals,’ and cancer-related fatigue can put breast cancer survivors at risk for falls.

    by Thomas Celona

  • September 23: The Week in Cancer News

    AACR Cancer Progress Report 2022 shows continued decline in cancer death rates, and genetic tests create opportunities but also confusion for breast cancer patients.

    by Eric Fitzsimmons