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  • Should All Kids With Cancer Get Genetic Testing?

    Testing children with cancer for hereditary mutations could impact their treatment and provide information relevant to other family members.

    by Marcus A. Banks

  • A Drive for Diversity

    African Americans are underrepresented in the Be The Match bone marrow donor registry. Patient advocates are working to change that.

    by Jon Kelvey

  • When Young Adults Need Care

    For adolescents and young adults who have been diagnosed with cancer, caregivers can play an influential—but often overlooked—role in providing help and support.

    by Carly Flumer

  • A Modern Family

    My diagnosis with colorectal cancer at age 32 affected my fertility. As a result of my experiences, I help others who have been diagnosed with cancer understand their choices related to fertility preservation and their options for becoming a parent.

    by Allison Rosen

  • When COVID-19 Comes Home

    I have brain cancer, and my wife is a health care worker. These are some questions we had to consider leading up to and after her diagnosis with COVID-19.

    by Adam Hayden

  • Nothing but Time

    A father with metastatic kidney cancer embraces moments with his 3-year-old son while pondering how he'll be remembered.

    by Adam P. Stern

  • When Cancer Becomes an Unwanted Priority

    Amanda Rose Ferraro's leukemia diagnosis forced her to spend time at the hospital away from her 3-year-old-son. She calls focusing on her health and leaving her son “the hardest thing I have ever had to do.”

    by Amanda Rose Ferraro

  • Learning to Share

    At first, I wanted to hide my cancer diagnosis. My son showed me what a mistake that was.

    by Lenn Robbins

  • Life After Pediatric Brain Cancer

    Survivors of pediatric brain or spinal cord tumors can have cognitive and physical impairments. Researchers say that these deficits can be minimized with the right interventions.

    by Cheryl Platzman Weinstock

  • Being Candid About Cancer

    As a father with an aggressive brain cancer, I've opted against elaborate metaphors and in favor of candid speech when talking about cancer with my children.

    by Adam Hayden

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