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  • Putting the Patient in the Driver’s Seat

    In her new book, Cancer Support Community executive chair Kim Thiboldeaux offers advice to patients on how to steer their way through a cancer diagnosis, treatment and beyond.

    by Kevin McLaughlin

  • Roadblocks to Care

    Some cancer patients struggle to find transportation to their appointments. The coronavirus pandemic has further limited options for patients looking for rides.

    by Anna Goshua

  • The Return to Work

    What happens if your workplace reopens before you're ready to return or you're an essential worker? For some people who have been diagnosed with cancer, accommodations may be possible.

    by Jen Tota McGivney

  • Parking Costs Take a Hidden Toll on Cancer Patients

    People with cancer can pay significant costs for parking at cancer centers while receiving their treatment, a study finds.

    by Marcus A. Banks

  • Using Leftover Cancer Drugs to Help Others

    Cancer drug repositories that accept unused drugs could provide an affordable source of medications for patients in need, while also providing patients left with extra drugs a way to give back.

    by Jon Kelvey

  • Despite Generic Imatinib, Cost of Treating CML Remains High

    The arrival of generic versions of the targeted therapy imatinib only modestly reduced the cost of treating chronic myelogenous leukemia patients, a study finds.

    by Anna Azvolinsky

  • Food Insecurity and Cancer

    After discovering that some patients weren't able to access the food they needed, a community oncology practice partnered with a local food bank.

    by Jen Tota McGivney

  • Cancer Takes an Unequal Toll on Employment

    In a study of women with breast cancer in North Carolina, those who lived in rural areas or were black were more likely than urban white women to report negative changes in their employment.

    by Pamela Rafalow Grossman

  • Cancer and Credit

    The financial burden of a cancer diagnosis can lower a patient's credit score.

    by Shelly Rosenfeld

  • Cancer Care on a Native American Reservation

    For the first time, people living in the Navajo Nation who are diagnosed with cancer can get treated for the disease without leaving tribal lands.

    by Kate Yandell

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