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  • Putting the Patient in the Driver’s Seat

    In her new book, Cancer Support Community executive chair Kim Thiboldeaux offers advice to patients on how to steer their way through a cancer diagnosis, treatment and beyond.

    by Kevin McLaughlin

  • Rethinking Access to Disability Benefits

    Advances in screening and treatment mean there are more cancer survivors than ever, but survivors who struggle to work can face difficulty getting disability payments.

    by Jen Tota McGivney

  • Should All Kids With Cancer Get Genetic Testing?

    Testing children with cancer for hereditary mutations could impact their treatment and provide information relevant to other family members.

    by Marcus A. Banks

  • Understanding How Radiation Causes Cancer

    Researchers are investigating who is at greatest risk for radiation-induced cancers.

    by Kate Yandell

  • How Long Do Immunotherapy Side Effects Last?

    For people with melanoma who receive immune checkpoint inhibitors after surgery, side effects can remain even after treatment has been completed. These chronic side effects are most often mild.

    by Anna Goshua

  • Chemobrain: It’s Not Your Imagination

    Scientists discussed the mechanisms of chemotherapy-related cognitive impairment at a session dedicated to symptom science at the AACR Annual Meeting 2021.

    by Marci A. Landsmann

  • Living Beyond a Diagnosis

    Judy Pearson was surprised by the demands of cancer survivorship. Here, she offers tips on how to look at life after cancer.

    by Judy Pearson

  • When Young Adults Need Care

    For adolescents and young adults who have been diagnosed with cancer, caregivers can play an influential—but often overlooked—role in providing help and support.

    by Carly Flumer

  • Drug Dependence After Breast Surgery

    A study indicates that some breast cancer patients who receive mastectomy and reconstruction may be at risk of persistent drug use following surgery.

    by Marcus A. Banks

  • Beating the Bully Inside

    To gain control over fear of my breast cancer recurring, I called on lessons learned as a 5-year-old confronting the neighborhood bully.

    by Joan Harris

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