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  • The Return to Work

    What happens if your workplace reopens before you’re ready to return or you’re an essential worker? For some people who have been diagnosed with cancer, accommodations may be possible.

    by Jen Tota McGivney

  • Forward Look

    Here Come the Biosimilars

    As patents expire on biologic drugs, cancer patients get new options.

    by Stephen Ornes

  • Parking Costs Take a Hidden Toll on Cancer Patients

    People with cancer can pay significant costs for parking at cancer centers while receiving their treatment, a study finds.

    by Marcus A. Banks

  • Survivor Profile

    Sharing Her Strength

    Diagnosed with two cancers prior to turning 40, Rebecca Esparza uses her voice to advocate for policy changes to help people affected by cancer.

    by Lindsey Konkel

  • Using Leftover Cancer Drugs to Help Others

    Cancer drug repositories that accept unused drugs could provide an affordable source of medications for patients in need, while also providing patients left with extra drugs a way to give back.

    by Jon Kelvey

  • FORWARD LOOK

    Getting Help to Avoid Financial Distress

    Todd Yezefski on financial navigators.

    by Sue Rochman

  • Despite Generic Imatinib, Cost of Treating CML Remains High

    The arrival of generic versions of the targeted therapy imatinib only modestly reduced the cost of treating chronic myelogenous leukemia patients, a study finds.

    by Anna Azvolinsky

  • Clinical Trials: An African American Survivor’s Experience

    Melvin Mann benefited from joining a pivotal clinical trial for chronic myelogenous leukemia, but participation came with logistical challenges.

    by Melvin Mann

  • Food Insecurity and Cancer

    After discovering that some patients weren’t able to access the food they needed, a community oncology practice partnered with a local food bank.

    by Jen Tota McGivney

  • CAREGIVING WITH CONFIDENCE

    Take Financial Inventory

    Treatment-related expenses can increase stress on both caregivers and patients. Learning to talk about these concerns may help ease the burden.

    by Aimee Swartz

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