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  • FROM THE EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

    Human Papillomavirus Vaccines: Bad News, Good News and Great News

    Increased vaccination rates can help reduce cervical cancer as a worldwide health threat.

    by William G. Nelson, MD, PhD

  • BRCA: Who Should Be Tested?

    Genetic testing for mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes creates opportunities for cancer risk reduction. But 25 years after the mutations were discovered, some who could benefit from testing are still left out.

    by Sue Rochman

  • Our Own Words

    People with cancer and their loved ones find ways for their voices to be heard without filters.

    by Bradley Jones

  • Finding Support in Unlikely Places

    After her diagnosis with ovarian cancer, Patricia Anne Ward noticed that some friends and family pulled away. She found connection outside her usual circles.

    by Patricia Anne Ward

  • Why Is the Rate of Uterine Cancer Rising?

    Uterine cancer incidence is increasing in the U.S., particularly in Hispanic, Asian and black women, but obesity may play a smaller role in this change than was previously assumed.

    by Ashley P. Taylor

  • A New Guideline for Cervical Cancer Screening

    Physicians Lee Learman and Francisco Garcia discuss the updated U.S. Preventive Services Task Force guideline and the need to increase access to cervical cancer screening.

    by Anna Azvolinsky

  • Forward Look

    Young Survivors at Risk for HPV-Related Cancers

    Study finds low vaccination rates among teen survivors.

    by Kate Yandell

  • Cancer Control in the Community

    Successful public health initiatives to prevent, detect and treat cancer require widespread community participation.

    by Marci A. Landsmann

  • Forward Look

    Little Consensus on Ovarian Cancer Monitoring

    Tests and scans may be overused.

    by Kate Yandell

  • Survivor Profile

    Going Full Bore

    Susan Leighton, a 19-year survivor, is a powerful advocate for ovarian cancer research. Her advocacy, which began locally in northern Alabama, has reached the National Cancer Institute and the Department of Defense.

    by Sue Rochman

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From the AACR

  • Preventing Cervical Cancer

    Cervical cancer now accounts for less than 1% of cancer-related deaths among women in the United States.

  • New FDA Approvals

    The first new anti-cancer therapeutics approved in 2020 are for the treatment of two different types of soft tissue sarcoma.

  • Imaging and Immunotherapy

    Imaging a patient’s cancer—and the responses generated by the immune system—can provide information that may guide treatment decisions.

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