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week in cancer news
  • April 5: The Week in Cancer News

    More cancer patients are enrolling in clinical trials, and sentinel node biopsies alone may be adequate for some early-stage breast cancers.

    by Marci A. Landsmann

  • March 29: The Week in Cancer News

    Survival rates have increased for older AML patients who receive stem cell transplants, and cervical cancer diagnoses rise among women living in low-income counties.

    by Kevin McLaughlin

  • March 22: The Week in Cancer News

    First CAR T-cell therapy approval in chronic lymphocytic leukemia, and Environmental Protection Agency announces a complete ban on asbestos use in manufacturing.

    by Thomas Celona

  • March 15: The Week in Cancer News

    Modified CAR T-cell therapy shows promise in glioblastoma, and an immunotherapy may soon be available as an injection.

    by Eric Fitzsimmons

  • March 8: The Week in Cancer News

    Why do many Asian American women who have never smoked have lung cancer, and a report finds acne products can create cancer-causing benzine.

    by Marci A. Landsmann

  • March 1: The Week in Cancer News

    Many women must make decisions about preserving fertility while dealing with a cancer diagnosis, and head and neck cancer survivors face a higher stroke risk.

    by Kevin McLaughlin

  • February 23: The Week in Cancer News

    Melanoma drug becomes first cell therapy approved to treat a solid tumor, and a new method for treating mesothelioma extended patient survival in a recent trial.

    by Thomas Celona

  • February 16: The Week in Cancer News

    Researchers explore a try-everything approach to precision medicine, and physical activity may help ease cancer pain.

    by Kevin McLaughlin

  • February 9: The Week in Cancer News

    Patients and doctors urge researchers to study lower doses for cancer treatments, and the FDA faces criticism for not issuing a formaldehyde ban in hair straighteners.

    by Marci A. Landsmann

  • February 2: The Week in Cancer News

    Improving fitness linked to lower prostate cancer risk, and a study from Scotland finds no cervical cancer cases in women vaccinated before age 14.

    by Eric Fitzsimmons