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week in cancer news

  • December 6: The Week in Cancer News

    A study suggests an association between hair dye use and breast cancer, and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration adds a new indication for an immunotherapy-chemotherapy combination.

    by Kate Yandell

  • November 22: The Week in Cancer News

    Data from Northern Ireland suggest a fifth of cancer diagnoses are made in the emergency department, and a study investigates how the nervous system might be harnessed for cancer treatment.

    by Bradley Jones

  • November 15: The Week in Cancer News

    A study suggests the rate of melanoma diagnoses in adolescents and young adults is falling, and a health care reporter writes about the many difficult decisions she had to make after her cancer diagnosis.

    by Kate Yandell

  • November 8: The Week in Cancer News

    Some oncologists do not discuss the costs of genomic testing and resulting treatments with their patients, and preliminary results indicate that a cancer therapy using the CRISPR gene-editing technique is safe.

    by Kate Yandell

  • November 1: The Week in Cancer News

    Another drug shows preliminary signs of efficacy in treating patients with KRAS-mutated cancer, and a study indicates that minority cancer patients struggle to find doctors who share or understand their culture.

    by Kate Yandell

  • October 25: The Week in Cancer News

    A physician writes about her experiences treating patients with CAR-T cell therapy, and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration expands approval of an ovarian cancer drug based on a new biomarker.

    by Kate Yandell

  • October 18: The Week in Cancer News

    A chemotherapy drug used to treat childhood cancer is in short supply, and organizations update exercise recommendations for people who have been diagnosed with cancer.

    by Kate Yandell

  • October 11: The Week in Cancer News

    A researcher with melanoma writes about his experiences trying to modify his gut microbiome, and an article discusses what it means to call a cancer treatment “well tolerated.”

    by Kate Yandell

  • October 4: The Week in Cancer News

    More than half of patients with advanced melanoma who took an immunotherapy combination were alive five years later, and a targeted therapy appears to cause high blood pressure.

    by Kate Yandell

  • September 27: The Week in Cancer News

    A study examines how poor and minority patients are more likely to be diagnosed with cancer in the emergency room, and a cancer survivor considers the lasting effects of chemotherapy.

    by Bradley Jones

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