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  • The Health Legacy of 9/11

    People who were directly affected by the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks can receive screenings and care for medical conditions, including certain cancers, through the World Trade Center Health Program.

    by Brad Jones

  • A New Guideline for Cervical Cancer Screening

    Physicians Lee Learman and Francisco Garcia discuss the updated U.S. Preventive Services Task Force guideline and the need to increase access to cervical cancer screening.

    by Anna Azvolinsky

  • Some Pancreatic Cancers Are Hereditary

    A trio of recent studies indicates that pancreatic cancer is, in some cases, linked to mutations passed down from generation to generation.

    by Cheryl Platzman Weinstock

  • Predicting Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Two studies identify genetic mutations that could predict the risk of an aggressive blood cancer up to a decade before it is diagnosed.

    by Anna Azvolinsky

  • From the Editor-in-Chief

    DNA Profiling Moves From Forensics to Diagnostics

    DNA profiling technologies are providing new ways to detect and monitor cancer.

    by William G. Nelson, MD, PhD

  • Is 3-D Mammography Better?

    A study enrolling patients compares a newer form of digital mammography to conventional 2-D digital mammography.

    by Marci A. Landsmann

  • Cancer Control in the Community

    Successful public health initiatives to prevent, detect and treat cancer require widespread community participation.

    by Marci A. Landsmann

  • Forward Look

    Breast Density Matters

    Breast cancer risk factor may be overlooked.

    by Kendall K. Morgan

  • A Focus on Pediatric Cancer Screening

    The AACR shares research papers that summarize recommendations for monitoring children and adolescents with cancer predisposition syndromes.

    by Garrett M. Brodeur

  • Revised Prostate Cancer Screening Guidelines Proposed

    The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force suggests an individualized approach to prostate cancer screening.

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From the AACR

  • Making Mammography Better

    A study investigates whether artificial intelligence can reduce false-positive mammograms.

  • New FDA Approvals

    Three new cancer treatments have been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

  • Nobel Prize for Immunotherapy

    James P. Allison, PhD, a Fellow of the AACR Academy, won the 2018 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for his pioneering work in cancer immunotherapy.

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Janet Freeman-Daily: On Lung Cancer and Blame

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